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Elections and Voting

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Andover Local Elections

Next Local Election: Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Andover voting locations:
Andover High School Collins Field House for precincts 2,7, 7A, 8, 9 & 9A
Senior Center, Whittier Ct. for precincts 1 & 3
Wood Hill Middle School for precincts 4, 5 & 6

North Andover Local Elections

Next Local Election: Tuesday, March 28, 2017
North Andover voting locations:
North Andover High School, 430 Osgood St. for all precincts.

National and State Elections

Voter Information

Register to Vote

Contact your Town Clerk's office to:
  • register to vote
  • change your party affiliation
  • change your address
  • change your name
  • find out where to vote

Andover residents
Town Clerk
36 Bartlet St.
Andover, MA 01810
978-623-8255
townclerk@andoverma.gov
North Andover residents
Town Clerk
120 Main St.
North Andover, MA 01845
978-688-9502
jbradshaw@townofnorthandover.com

Registration Details

For a resident to be eligible to vote, that resident must be 18 years old and a United States citizen. Additionally, a resident must be registered to vote at least
  • 20 days before state and national elections
  • 20 days before town elections to vote in town elections or the annual town meeting
  • 10 days before a special town meeting

Registration is conducted at the Town Clerk's office in the Town Offices during normal business hours--8:30-4:30, Monday through Friday. The last day to register is 20 days prior to the election, and on that day the Town Clerk's office is open until 8:00 p.m.

Contact the Town Clerk's office in your respective town for specific voting dates, times, and locations. Registration may also be done by mail. Forms are available in the Town offices, libraries, and post offices. In Massachusetts registration is permanent if the person does not move from the community. However, your annual Town of Andover or North Andover census must be returned to remain on the active voter list.

Please note that the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) of 2002 requires that you provide your driver's license number or the last four digits of your social security number to register to vote. If you have neither, you must write "none" in the box on the Voter Registration Form and then you must provide a copy of your identification either with the mail-in Voter Registration Form or at your polling location when you vote for the first time. Sufficient identification includes a copy of a current and valid photo identification, current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document showing your name and address.

When voting in a primary, presidential or state election, you must take the ballot of the party in which you are enrolled, Democrat, Republican, or other recognized voter party. If you are unenrolled, you may choose the Democratic, Republican, or other party ballot for that primary. After so choosing and voting in a primary election, you will automatically go back to your unenrolled status.

Early Voting - 2016

The early voting period will begin October 24, 2016 and end on November 4, 2016. All cities and towns are required to hold early voting sessions during the local election official's regular business hours, and many are choosing to hold late, early, and weekend hours as well.

In Andover, the Town Clerk will be open late (until 8:00pm) on Tuesday, October 24 and Tuesday, November 1 and open on Saturday, October 29 from 10:00am-4:30pm.

In North Andover, the Town Clerk will be open late (until 8:00pm) on Tuesday, October 24 and Tuesday, November 1 and open on Saturday, October 29 from 9:00am-4:00pm.

Andover Redistricting - 2012

Effective January 1, 2012 Andover's precinct lines changed. Andover retains 9 precincts, but with new and different boundaries. Our state representative districts also changed. In addition, Andover is now split between the newly created 3rd and 6th Congressional Districts. The purpose of this article is to explain the redistricting process and the results.

Every ten years the Federal government conducts a national census; this was last done in 2010. The year following the Federal census, Massachusetts towns are required to review their precincts based on the Federal census population numbers. The idea is simple in concept. You take the population number from the Federal census and divide that by the total number of precincts. This gives you the so-called "target population" for each precinct. No precinct can have more than 4,000 residents.

Andover's population according to the 2010 Federal census is 33,201. Dividing that by 9 we arrived at a target population for each precinct of 3,689 residents. In re-drawing the precincts we are permitted to vary the population for each precinct by plus or minus 5% of the target population. This means that each Andover precinct has to have a minimum of 3,505 residents and a maximum of 3,873 residents. Our goal was to maintain as nearly as possible the existing precinct boundary lines so as to impact the fewest number of voters. We were largely successful. Approximately 95% of Andover's registered voters will remain in their same voting precinct. Only about 5% of registered voters will be voting in a new precinct. Municipal reprecincting was completed state wide last summer.

State Districts

Once municipal reprecincting was completed the legislature turned to the task of redrawing the State Senatorial and Representative Districts. Andover remains in the 2nd Essex and Middlesex Senatorial District. We have seen a change in our State Representative Districts. Prior to the change Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 9 were in the 17th Essex District while Precincts 1, 7 & 8 were in the 18th Essex District. The 17th and 18th Essex Districts were dramatically changed under the new redistricting plan. Precincts 2, 3 & 4 are now in the new 17th Essex District while Precincts 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, & 9 are now in the new 18th Essex District.

Maps of the new State Senate and Representative Districts can be found on the Massachusetts General Court website at https://malegislature.gov/District/ProposedDistrictMaps.

U.S Congressional Districts

Massachusetts lost a seat in the U.S. Congress based on the 2010 Federal census. The Massachusetts Congressional delegation was reduced from ten seats to nine seats. The Special Joint Committee on Redistricting, a joint committee of the Massachusetts Senate and House, was tasked with creating the new Congressional Districts. The Joint Committee chose to go with, as nearly as possible, zero deviation from the "target population" for each new Congressional District. Of the nine new Congressional Districts created six have populations of 727,514 while three have populations of 727,515.

The Joint Committee's insistence on zero population deviation between Congressional Districts created unfortunate results for a number of Massachusetts communities, including Andover. Before redistricting, Andover had been entirely in the old 5th Congressional District. Andover now finds itself split between the newly created 3rd and 6th Congressional Districts. We are not just split along precinct lines. Andover, like nine other Massachusetts communities, finds itself with a split within its precincts between Congressional Districts.

Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, & 6 are entirely within the new 3rd Congressional District. Precincts 1 & 8 are entirely within the new 6th Congressional District. Precinct 7 is split with roughly three-fourths of the population in the 3rd Congressional District and the remainder in the 6th Congressional District. Precinct 9 is also split with 3,610 residents of Precinct 9 in the 3rd Congressional District and one neighborhood of 14 residents in the 6th Congressional District.

Maps of the new 3rd and 6th Congressional Districts can be found on the Massachusetts General Court website: https://malegislature.gov/District/ProposedDistrictMaps.

The Special Joint Committee on Redistricting released its Congressional Districts redistricting plan on November 7th with a one week public comment period before it was scheduled to go to the full legislature for approval. I communicated with the Committee on November 10th expressing my concern with the plan, especially the inconvenience to the public, and the difficulties and additional cost involved with managing split precincts on election day. I pointed out to the Joint Committee that splitting Andover's Precincts 7 and 9 between the 3rd and 6th Congressional Districts could be avoided by allowing a 1/10 of 1% variation from the target populations for the 3rd and 6th Districts; and that Andover could be placed wholly within the 3rd Congressional District with a modest 1.12% variation from the target populations for these Districts. Despite my objections, and those of others with similar concerns, the plan was adopted by the legislature and signed into law.

Splitting precincts between Congressional Districts presents challenges for elections with seats in the 3rd or 6th Congressional Districts on the ballot. In 2012 we have two such elections, the State Primary in September and the Presidential Election in November; (the March 6th Presidential Primary and the March 27th Annual Town Election do not have Congressional seats on the ballot).

Balloting

We will be using several different ballots for elections with Congressional races:

The ballot for Precincts 2, 3, & 4 will include the 17th Essex State Representative District and the 3rd Congressional District;

The ballot for Precincts 5, & 6 and most of Precincts 7 & 9 will include the 18th Essex State Representative District and the 3rd Congressional District;

The ballot for Precincts 1 & 8 and portions of Precincts 7 & 9 will include the 18th Essex State Representative District and the 6th Congressional District.

As you can see from the above, voters in Precincts 7 & 9 will not all receive the same ballot this year for the September State Primary Election or the November Presidential Election. We will take steps to educate the affected voters. Precinct 9 is the easier to deal with because of the small number of voters in that precinct who will be taking the ballot for the 6th Congressional District. I plan to reach out to those voters personally. Precinct 7 is more problematic because of the relatively large number of voters who will be receiving the ballot for the 6th Congressional District. We will have to divide Precinct 7 into two sub-precincts, 7A & 7B, with separate voter lists and check-in tables at the polling place. We will send out written notices to all affected households.

The new precinct map, including the Congressional Districts, can be found on the Town website at http://www.andoverma.gov. The map can be found on the Town Clerk's web page. Voters can also search for their precinct by address by going to the Town Clerk's web page. Under "Main Menu" on the Town web site home page; choose "Department Directory", then "Town Clerk", then "Precinct Search". This will bring you to the Secretary of the Commonwealth's web site where you can search for your precinct by address.

If you have questions please contact the Town Clerk's Office at 978-623-8255 or by e-mail at lmurphy@andoverma.gov or townclerk@andoverma.gov.

Information provided by Larry Murphy, Andover Town Clerk.